Studio

Bergini

Rationalism on Set: Glamour and Modernity in 1930s Italian Cinema was an exhibition at the Estorick Collection in collaboration with RIBA, exploring a little-known period of Italian cinematic history, highlighting the strong Modernist influence apparent in the set designs created for a number of romantic comedies during the inter-war years. A selection of vintage photographs were complemented by sketches and contemporary periodicals from the Cineteca Nazionale, Centro Sperimentale di Cinematografia (Rome), the Cineteca di Bologna, the Museo Nazionale del Cinema (Turin) and the RIBA Collections.

The catalogue makes use of three different paper stocks to separate the featured essay, photos, and sketches. The type is our interpretation of a popular typeface contemporary to the period. The front cover was done in shiny, black foil, contrasting the uncoated gray paper and suggesting a reference to the italian modernist style featured in the exhibition.

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Rationalism on Set,

Estorick Collection,

exhibition catalogue,

2018

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The Charles Dickens Museum in London – also known as 48 Doughty Street – is the only museum dedicated to Dickens in London, and is housed in his Bloomsbury home from which he gained fame writing classics such as the Pickwick Papers and Oliver Twist.

Studio Bergini were approched to give the Museum a full visual revamp, with a new logo, visual identity system, signage, wayfinding, and exhibition displays.

By using research into the personality and personal style of Dickens as a base, the identity avoids nostalgic pastiche of Regency and Victorian styles by introducing vibrant colours and bold shapes – accentuated by the use of Chiswick Grotesque, a recent typeface by Paul Barnes which references the same kind of British Vernacular lettering that would have been found in the streets of London in Dickens’s time.

Implementation is still in progress — more updates coming soon.

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Charles Dickens Museum,

London,

Visual identity,

2017

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Cover design commission responding to the theme Creative Addiction and a short interview, for the January 2018 issue of Japanese BRAIN Magazine, published 1 December 2017.

What is the idea for this cover?
And how did you make it?


In our day-to-day work, we see the creative process as a continuous task of problem solving, much like a puzzle. Starting with a brief, in this case just two words, from there somehow you have to find your way to some great final, unknown solution. It can be a very daunting experience when you feel like you have to pull something clever out of thin air, seemingly with endless opportunities – but that makes it all the more exciting once you find a clue and start winding your way down a good path. This addiction to problem solving is maybe what makes us “creatives” want to keep doing what we do.

Our cover extends this problem-solving task to the readers, presenting them with a puzzle in several layers in a sort of reverse version of our creative process.

First, they need to decode the letterforms. Then they need to understand the system of colour coding which ties the words together. Once the individual words are readable, they can start trying to combine them into a sentence; “I add reactive tonic” seems like the best option, but it’s strange—because it’s an anagram. Arranged another way, the sentence reads “creative addiction”.

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Brain Magazine cover,

Brain Magazine,

magazine cover,

2017

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Nuart Festival is considered one of the world’s leading Street- and Urban Art festivals, comprising indoor and outdoor exhibitions, debates, and a critical forum. It was held in 2017 for its 17th year in Stavanger, Norway – our 5th year as Nuart collaborators and designers of the festival's visual identity.

Nuart aims to explore and present new movements and works with artists operating across the spectrum of “Street Art”. Street art has its roots in situationism, graffiti, post-graffiti, muralism, comic culture, stencil art and activism amongst many other things. It is without a doubt the most exciting development in visual art for decades. – Martyn Reed, Founder and Director of Nuart

The 2017 identity focused on the concept of play, one of the keywords for Nuart and one of the cornerstones of Situationism, a constant point of reference for the festival. The main visual elements; digitally outlined shapes which reference collage, decollage, and cut-outs, and the way the type is used in conjunction with this; are a digital take on the DIY aesthetic associated with Situationism and its related movements and styles of political graffiti and image-making.

The image featured across the 2016 identity is a mural by Ampparito, titled I Accept the Terms & Conditions.

The image – a large painting of a fishing hook – was picked because of its reference in this context both to Stavanger as an old fishing town, and at the same time to the city's current ambition to brand itself as a "Smart City".

Studio Bergini were responsible for the visual identity and all related materials, including posters, flyers, advertising banners, newspaper and magazine ads, t-shirts, tote bags, food tokens, exhibition vinyls, web banners, newsletters etc.

We also produced the first issue of the Nuart Journal, which doubled as the festival catalog, containing critical essays by leading academics, artists, and curators in the field (download available here).

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Nuart Festival 2017,

Nuart,

visual identity,

2017

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Edition of 40 books which together contain all of of the scrap prints produced at the Royal Duplication Centre, Royal College of Art, Kensington Gore, London SW7, during the years MMXVI & MMXVII.

A special XL version containing 1/10th of the scraps was produced in an edition of 1 for the Ideal Science exhibition at the Newlyn Art gallery in Cornwall.

Perfect bound in velvet book cloth with foil bocked front cover.
Produced at the London Centre for Book Arts.

Available through A6BOOKS

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RDC Annual Report,

The Royal Duplication Centre,

Publication,

2017

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A6BOOKS is a new project by the London Centre for Book Arts. It aims to help promote and distribute books, zines, and publications by emerging artists. With a simple criterion – work must be A6 size [105×148mm] – and an inclusive open-submission process, they hope to create a new way for artists to reach their readers, with accepted submissions on display and available for sale in the LCBA bookshop.

Studio Bergini were responsible for the project's visual identity and website design. These follow a pared down approach that relies mainly on the colourful custom lettering we drew for the seven characters A 6 B O O K S (all based on the DIN A-size proportions), together with the font Lars Bold Condensed.

a6books.org

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A6BOOKS,

London Centre for Book Arts,

visual identity,

2017

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For her graduate exhibition at CCS Bard in Hudson Valley, New York, Marta Cacciavillani approached us for the design of her exhibition identity and the book Comizi d'Amore (love meetings) – a transcript and English translation of selected dialogues from the film with the same title by the Italian director, poet, and intellectual Pier Paolo Pasolini.

The exhibition took its title from an essay written in 1965 by Pasolini. The Written Language of Reality grapples with questions of realism and actuality. The exhibition brought together a group of works by Yto Barrada, Basim Magdy, and Akram Zaatari that staged a complicated, broken relation between image, text, and script.

The visual identity – which was applied to the book, wall vinyls, labelling, hand-out, and online promotion – focused on Pasolini’s use of the typewriter (an Olivetti Lettera 22) in his work, and on the standardized style guidelines in which he would have written his movie scripts. We created a hybrid font for the project, using the international standard font for script writing (Courier) for capitals, numerals, and some punctuation, and mixing it with Recta, a very prominent typeface in 1960s Italy. These simple elements created a subtly iconic identity for the exhibition.

The Written Language of Reality was appeared on 9 April 2017 through 28 May 2017 at the Hessel Museum of Art and CCS Bard Galleries.

http://www.bard.edu/ccs/the-written-language-of-reality/

Installation shots by Chris Kendall
(some have been cropped).

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The Written Language of Reality,

Marta Cacciavillani,

exhibition design,

2017

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