Studio

Bergini

For her graduate exhibition at CCS Bard in Hudson Valley, New York, Marta Cacciavillani approached us for the design of her exhibition identity and the book Comizi d'Amore (love meetings) – a transcript and English translation of selected dialogues from the film with the same title by the Italian director, poet, and intellectual Pier Paolo Pasolini.

The exhibition took its title from an essay written in 1965 by Pasolini. The Written Language of Reality grapples with questions of realism and actuality. The exhibition brought together a group of works by Yto Barrada, Basim Magdy, and Akram Zaatari that staged a complicated, broken relation between image, text, and script.

The visual identity – which was applied to the book, wall vinyls, labelling, hand-out, and online promotion – focused on Pasolini’s use of the typewriter (an Olivetti Lettera 22) in his work, and on the standardized style guidelines in which he would have written his movie scripts. We created a hybrid font for the project, using the international standard font for script writing (Courier) for capitals, numerals, and some punctuation, and mixing it with Recta, a very prominent typeface in 1960s Italy. These simple elements created a subtly iconic identity for the exhibition.

The Written Language of Reality was appeared on 9 April 2017 through 28 May 2017 at the Hessel Museum of Art and CCS Bard Galleries.

http://www.bard.edu/ccs/the-written-language-of-reality/

Installation shots by Chris Kendall
(some have been cropped).

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The Written Language of Reality,

Marta Cacciavillani,

exhibition design,

2017

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A6BOOKS is a new project by the London Centre for Book Arts. It aims to help promote and distribute books, zines, and publications by emerging artists. With a simple criterion – work must be A6 size [105×148mm] – and an inclusive open-submission process, they hope to create a new way for artists to reach their readers, with accepted submissions on display and available for sale in the LCBA bookshop.

Studio Bergini were responsible for the project's visual identity and website design. These follow a pared down approach that relies mainly on the colourful custom lettering we drew for the seven characters A 6 B O O K S (all based on the DIN A-size proportions), together with the font Lars Bold Condensed.

a6books.org

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A6BOOKS,

London Centre for Book Arts,

visual identity,

2017

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Nuart Festival is considered one of the world’s leading Street- and Urban Art festivals, comprising indoor and outdoor exhibitions, debates, and a critical forum. It was held in 2016 for its 16th year in Stavanger, Norway – our 4th year as Nuart collaborators and designers of the festival's visual identity.

Nuart aims to explore and present new movements and works with artists operating across the spectrum of “Street Art”. Street art has its roots in situationism, graffiti, post-graffiti, muralism, comic culture, stencil art and activism amongst many other things. It is without a doubt the most exciting development in visual art for decades. – Martyn Reed, Founder and Director of Nuart

The 2016 identity focused on the concept of play, one of the keywords for Nuart and one of the cornerstones of Situationism, a constant point of reference for the festival. The main visual elements; digitally outlined blobs which reference collage, cut-outs, and hand-rendered typography; and the way the type is used in conjunction with this; are a digital take on the DIY aesthetic associated with Situationism and its related movements and styles of political graffiti and image-making.

The image featured across the 2016 identity is a mural by Fintan Magee.

Studio Bergini were responsible for the visual identity and all related materials, including everything from posters, flyers, advertising banners, newspaper and magazine ads, t-shirts and tote bags, food tokens, exhibition vinyls, web banners, newsletters – as well as a newspaper catalog containing critical essays by leading academics, artists, and curators in the field.

A small side-project was initiated during the 4-day festival period, in which eight 3×1m banners with situationist slogans were installed around the city of Stavanger.

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Nuart Festival 2016,

Nuart,

visual identity,

2016

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Primitive Propositions: A Proposal for Exhibition is a publication made in collaboration with artist collective Jeffrey Charles Henry Peacock including contributions from Terry Atkinson (of Art & Language), Michael Hampton, and Matthew Poole. It is intended as a form of artist proposal, exhibition, and art object in itself.
The publication comes in the form of an A5 ring binder containing various text-based inserts, utilising a wide variety of printing processes and materials. It was necessary that the proposal could be added to, amended, and corrected over an extended period of time, as further research was collected by the artists. Finding a form that could successfully contend with these difficulties was important.

The binder arises from the idea of a physical artist proposal. The typography is reduced to a default digital standard such as those found in software like MS Word. Times was used as the primary typeface; but was tweaked to include square dots rather than circular ones, as a reference to the grid drawings in the first part of the project.

The organization of the publication is meant to reflect the relative inaccessibility of much of the written content, by appearing as a dry, bureaucratic object, and by requiring an effort of physical engagement in order to simply access the content.

Primitive Propositions: A Proposal for Exhibition was launched as an edition of 350 copies at the East Street Arts in Leeds, October 2015, as part of an accompanying exhibition coinciding with the opening of The British Art Show.

However, additional material was added post-launch, with a second and final launch of the publication taking place at the Westminster Reference Library in London, December 2016.
A potential future exhibition would see the finalization of the overall project.

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Primitive Propositions,

Jeffrey Charles Henry Peacock,

publication,

2016

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In May 2017, Nuart – the Street Art festival we’ve been working with since 2012 – organized its first edition outside the city of Stavanger, staging a festival in Aberdeen, Scotland. A huge public and civic success, it has been scheduled to return to the city each spring for the next four years.

Known as the Granite City for its predominant use of granite as building material, Nuart Aberdeen was a fresh breath of colour to the city that saw its population interacting with their public spaces in entirely new ways. As the city is only just starting to loosen its zero-tolerance policies towards Graffiti, Street Art etc., the new public artworks had a significant impact on the otherwise pristine city centre.

Taking our cue from Aberdeen’s nickname, we constructed a display typeface inspired by the way granite is traditionally cut: with many rough facets, as seen in plenty of the city’s architecture. The font is in one weight and caps only, with a few alternate characters for variation.

The font, called Granite Headline, became the backbone of our visual identity for the festival, combined with a strong purple colour and a very simple layout system dividing surfaces into separate image and text areas.

Nuart Aberdeen was also the first festival to pilot our custom-built web template for Nuart, developed in collaboration with Turtuga Labs.

nuartaberdeen.co.uk

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Nuart Aberdeen,

Nuart,

visual identity,

2017

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The Royal Duplication Centre is our stencil duplication/Riso printing workshop currently based in the Visual Communication department at the Royal College of Art in South Kensington, London.

At the start of 2016, we were asked to set up our printing equipment in the RCA to introduce the MA Visual Communication department to Riso printing. Since March that year, we have been managing the workshop, opening its services twice per week to teach the workings of the Riso printing process through introductory sessions and Riso-related workshops, experimentation, and helping students print their work.

Royal Duplication Shopping Centre
(website by Kristoffer Halse Sølling)

instagram: @royal_duplication_centre

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The Royal Duplication Centre,

Royal College of Art, London,

workshop,

2016–present

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William Davey approached us to design a book for one of his projects, Happy Endings. Our task was to give his texts and illustrations the likeness of a furniture catalog while supporting his examination of classic British soap operas, which we achieved through subtle typographic references.

Statement from William Davey:

This project examines the storyline conventions and structures of soap operas.

As a viewer we are told that the soap opera offers a reflection of real life through the identification of character tropes and hard hitting storylines. However, I believe soaps really offer a dramatized voyeurism through the ongoing episode, or the ever expanding middle.

These archetypical soap opera assemblies easily lend themselves to the pre-packaged furniture catalogue.
The catalogue promises convenience of choice, stylish design at an affordable price, and the organization of life through Tupperware boxes and waste storage ideas.

By reframing the soap opera in the context of the furniture catalogue I aim to reposition the familiar archetypes as a self assembly, flat pack commodity.

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Happy Endings,

William Davey,

artist publication,

2016

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