Studio

Bergini

LCBA Shopfront

Our good friends and neighbours at the London Centre for Book Arts celebrated their 5th anniversary of existence in 2015, also coinciding with the 50th anniversary of Space Studios. On that occasion, they tasked us with revitalising their shopfront.

Previously a slightly worn, plain varnished plywood facade, we decided to give it some character by applying seven different colours inspired by the workshop. Each panel in the wall was treated as a separate surface, creating an interesting layout of coloured panels, with the desired effect of looking aesthetically pleasing and intriguing without being too flashy.

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LCBA Shopfront,

London Centre for Book Arts,

Exterior design,

2018

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Nuart Journal Vol.1 No.1

In September 2018, our long time collaborators Nuart Festival launched the Nuart Journal, after first testing the concept as part of the 2017 festival programme.

The Nuart Journal ties in with the pre-existing series of academic symposia Nuart Plus, and is a bi-annual, peer-reviewed academic journal publishing provocative and critical writings on a range of topics relating to street art practice and urban art cultures.

As a first issue, Volume 1 (2018) was a test subject for a journal which will be continually evolving both in terms of design and content. Published in a magazine-sized format with a soft cover and bound by block stapling, it aims to simultaneously adhere to and subvert the typical journal format, continuously referring back to Nuart’s core references, the Punk and Situationist movements.

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Nuart Journal Vol.1 No.1,

Nuart,

Publication,

2018

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A New Figurative Art 1920–1945

A New Figurative Art 1920–1945: Works from the Giuseppe Iannacone Collection was an exhibition at the Estorick Collection of Modern Italian Art in London featuring artworks from the collection of Giuseppe Iannaccone – one of the most outstanding private collections of Italian art from the inter-war years – showing works by Luigi Broggini, Renato Guttuso, Carlo Levi, Mario Mafai, Aligi Sassu, Scipione and Emilio Vedova, Filippo de Pisis, Fausto Pirandello, Ottone Rosai and Lucio Fontana.

The catalogue is a pocket size book in two sections, with the first section featuring essays from Giuseppe Iannaccone and the curator, and the second containing full colour reproductions of the artworks featured in the exhibition.

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A New Figurative Art 1920–1945,

Estorick Collection,

Exhibition catalogue,

2018

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Nuart Festival 2018

2018 marked the sixth year of our collaboration with Nuart Festival, and our third iteration of the current visual identity. Having previously been re-shaped each year, this time we laid the groundwork for a more permanent visual identity for the festival.

The visual concept builds on our work from previous years, where we – using computer software as our default tool for designing – do our own interpretation of the cut-outs, speech bubbles, and collage/décollage techniques found in the visual output of the Punks and Situationists.

As well as having defined a logo and colour palette, we introduced our new, custom typeface – SB Spartan – to be the defining element of the identity. The typeface (drawn by us) builds on Spartan Classified (which we used for the 2017 identity), taking some core visual cues from the original and re-making it into a more usable, full font family. Currently consisting of a Regular and Bold extended latin with italics, it’s still a work in progress, with the aim of expanding to more weights and characters as the identity develops over time.

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Nuart Festival 2018,

Nuart,

Visual identity,

2018

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CSM Foundation Show

For the CSM Foundation show of 2018, the course wanted to present an exhibition that, rather than focusing on each student’s individual work as in a typical degree show, would instead give an overview of the course.

It was curated by Emma Tod and Gary Colclough, and the exhibition graphics done by Studio Bergini.

The exhibition was colour coded to indicate the four subject areas of the course; Fine Art, Fashion & Textiles, 3D Design & Architecture, and Graphic Communication Design. The colours were used for the course descriptions at the centre of the space, and were reflected in the coloured vinyl stickers used for the labelling system around the gallery.

To communicate the playful, experimental, bold, and “in progress” spirit of the Foundation course, we developed a display typeface for use around the exhibition. Grotesqini was created by combining features of various old grotesque typefaces, which then were combined and redrawn to create a single font with a lot of playful character and a feeling of being a bit rough around the edges and unfinished.

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CSM Foundation Show,

Central Saint Martins,

Visual identity,

2018

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Rationalism on Set

Rationalism on Set: Glamour and Modernity in 1930s Italian Cinema was an exhibition at the Estorick Collection in collaboration with RIBA, exploring a little-known period of Italian cinematic history, highlighting the strong Modernist influence apparent in the set designs created for a number of romantic comedies during the inter-war years. A selection of vintage photographs were complemented by sketches and contemporary periodicals from the Cineteca Nazionale, Centro Sperimentale di Cinematografia (Rome), the Cineteca di Bologna, the Museo Nazionale del Cinema (Turin) and the RIBA Collections.

The catalogue makes use of three different paper stocks to separate the featured essay, photos, and sketches. The type is our interpretation of a popular typeface contemporary to the period. The front cover was done in shiny, black foil, contrasting the uncoated gray paper and suggesting a reference to the italian modernist style featured in the exhibition.

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Rationalism on Set,

Estorick Collection,

Exhibition catalogue,

2018

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Charles Dickens Museum

The Charles Dickens Museum in London – also known as 48 Doughty Street – is the only museum dedicated to Dickens in London, and is housed in his Bloomsbury home from which he gained fame writing classics such as the Pickwick Papers and Oliver Twist.

Studio Bergini were approched to give the Museum a full visual revamp, with a new logo, visual identity system, signage, wayfinding, and exhibition displays.

By using research into the personality and personal style of Dickens as a base, the identity avoids nostalgic pastiche of Regency and Victorian styles by introducing vibrant colours and bold shapes – accentuated by the use of Chiswick Grotesque, a recent typeface by Paul Barnes which references the same kind of British Vernacular lettering that would have been found in the streets of London in Dickens’s time.

Implementation is still in progress — more updates coming soon.

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Charles Dickens Museum,

London,

Visual identity,

2017

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Brain Magazine cover

Cover design commission responding to the theme Creative Addiction and a short interview, for the January 2018 issue of Japanese BRAIN Magazine, published 1 December 2017.

What is the idea for this cover?
And how did you make it?


In our day-to-day work, we see the creative process as a continuous task of problem solving, much like a puzzle. Starting with a brief, in this case just two words, from there somehow you have to find your way to some great final, unknown solution. It can be a very daunting experience when you feel like you have to pull something clever out of thin air, seemingly with endless opportunities – but that makes it all the more exciting once you find a clue and start winding your way down a good path. This addiction to problem solving is maybe what makes us “creatives” want to keep doing what we do.

Our cover extends this problem-solving task to the readers, presenting them with a puzzle in several layers in a sort of reverse version of our creative process.

First, they need to decode the letterforms. Then they need to understand the system of colour coding which ties the words together. Once the individual words are readable, they can start trying to combine them into a sentence; “I add reactive tonic” seems like the best option, but it’s strange—because it’s an anagram. Arranged another way, the sentence reads “creative addiction”.

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Brain Magazine cover,

Brain Magazine,

Magazine cover,

2017

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Nuart Slogans

Over the past couple of years, we’ve collaborated with Nuart on a series of interventions. Taking from their main inspiration, the Situationists, we referenced a set of slogans associated with the movement and printed them on banners which were then hung around the city. Slogans have also been printed as posters and stuck on the revolving doors of a hotel.

The banners serve as a sort of mobile manifesto, popping up in new places as the festival crew moves around. The slogans eventually made their way onto t-shirts and tote bags for sale and for use by the crew during festival rigging.

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Nuart Slogans,

Nuart,

Interventions,

2016–present

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Nuart Festival 2017

Nuart Festival is considered one of the world’s leading Street- and Urban Art festivals, comprising indoor and outdoor exhibitions, debates, and a critical forum. It was held in 2017 for its 17th year in Stavanger, Norway – our 5th year as Nuart collaborators and designers of the festival's visual identity.

Nuart aims to explore and present new movements and works with artists operating across the spectrum of “Street Art”. Street art has its roots in situationism, graffiti, post-graffiti, muralism, comic culture, stencil art and activism amongst many other things. It is without a doubt the most exciting development in visual art for decades. – Martyn Reed, Founder and Director of Nuart

The 2017 identity focused on the concept of play, one of the keywords for Nuart and one of the cornerstones of Situationism, a constant point of reference for the festival. The main visual elements; digitally outlined shapes which reference collage, decollage, and cut-outs, and the way the type is used in conjunction with this; are a digital take on the DIY aesthetic associated with Situationism and its related movements and styles of political graffiti and image-making.

The image featured across the 2016 identity is a mural by Ampparito, titled I Accept the Terms & Conditions.

The image – a large painting of a fishing hook – was picked because of its reference in this context both to Stavanger as an old fishing town, and at the same time to the city's current ambition to brand itself as a "Smart City".

Studio Bergini were responsible for the visual identity and all related materials, including posters, flyers, advertising banners, newspaper and magazine ads, t-shirts, tote bags, food tokens, exhibition vinyls, web banners, newsletters etc.

We also produced the first issue of the Nuart Journal, which doubled as the festival catalog, containing critical essays by leading academics, artists, and curators in the field (download available here).

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Nuart Festival 2017,

Nuart,

Visual identity,

2017

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RDC Annual Report

Edition of 40 books which together contain all of of the scrap prints produced at the Royal Duplication Centre, Royal College of Art, Kensington Gore, London SW7, during the years MMXVI & MMXVII.

A special XL version containing 1/10th of the scraps was produced in an edition of 1 for the Ideal Science exhibition at the Newlyn Art gallery in Cornwall. It was exhibited again at the RCA as part of HIDDEN, November 2018.

Perfect bound in velvet book cloth with foil bocked front cover.
Produced at the London Centre for Book Arts.

Available through A6BOOKS

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RDC Annual Report,

The Royal Duplication Centre,

Publication,

2017

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The Written Language of Reality

For her graduate exhibition at CCS Bard in Hudson Valley, New York, Marta Cacciavillani approached us for the design of her exhibition identity and the book Comizi d'Amore (love meetings) – a transcript and English translation of selected dialogues from the film with the same title by the Italian director, poet, and intellectual Pier Paolo Pasolini.

The exhibition took its title from an essay written in 1965 by Pasolini. The Written Language of Reality grapples with questions of realism and actuality. The exhibition brought together a group of works by Yto Barrada, Basim Magdy, and Akram Zaatari that staged a complicated, broken relation between image, text, and script.

The visual identity – which was applied to the book, wall vinyls, labelling, hand-out, and online promotion – focused on Pasolini’s use of the typewriter (an Olivetti Lettera 22) in his work, and on the standardized style guidelines in which he would have written his movie scripts. We created a hybrid font for the project, using the international standard font for script writing (Courier) for capitals, numerals, and some punctuation, and mixing it with Recta, a very prominent typeface in 1960s Italy. These simple elements created a subtly iconic identity for the exhibition.

The Written Language of Reality was appeared on 9 April 2017 through 28 May 2017 at the Hessel Museum of Art and CCS Bard Galleries.

http://www.bard.edu/ccs/the-written-language-of-reality/

Installation shots by Chris Kendall
(some have been cropped).

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The Written Language of Reality,

Marta Cacciavillani,

Book + exhibition design,

2017

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A6BOOKS

A6BOOKS is a new project by the London Centre for Book Arts. It aims to help promote and distribute books, zines, and publications by emerging artists. With a simple criterion – work must be A6 size [105×148mm] – and an inclusive open-submission process, they hope to create a new way for artists to reach their readers, with accepted submissions on display and available for sale in the LCBA bookshop.

Studio Bergini were responsible for the project's visual identity and website design. These follow a pared down approach that relies mainly on the colourful custom lettering we drew for the seven characters A 6 B O O K S (all based on the DIN A-size proportions), together with the font Lars Bold Condensed.

a6books.org

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A6BOOKS,

London Centre for Book Arts,

Visual identity,

2017

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Nuart Aberdeen

In May 2017, Nuart – the Street Art festival we’ve been working with since 2012 – organized its first edition outside the city of Stavanger, staging a festival in Aberdeen, Scotland. A huge public and civic success, it has been scheduled to return to the city each spring for the next four years.

Known as the Granite City for its predominant use of granite as building material, Nuart Aberdeen was a fresh breath of colour to the city that saw its population interacting with their public spaces in entirely new ways. As the city is only just starting to loosen its zero-tolerance policies towards Graffiti, Street Art etc., the new public artworks had a significant impact on the otherwise pristine city centre.

Taking our cue from Aberdeen’s nickname, we constructed a display typeface inspired by the way granite is traditionally cut: with many rough facets, as seen in plenty of the city’s architecture. The font is in one weight and caps only, with a few alternate characters for variation.

The font, called Granite Headline, became the backbone of our visual identity for the festival, combined with a strong purple colour and a very simple layout system dividing surfaces into separate image and text areas.

Nuart Aberdeen was also the first festival to pilot our custom-built web template for Nuart, developed in collaboration with Turtuga Labs.

nuartaberdeen.co.uk

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Nuart Aberdeen,

Nuart,

Visual identity,

2017

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Nuart Festival 2016

Nuart Festival is considered one of the world’s leading Street- and Urban Art festivals, comprising indoor and outdoor exhibitions, debates, and a critical forum. It was held in 2016 for its 16th year in Stavanger, Norway – our 4th year as Nuart collaborators and designers of the festival's visual identity.

Nuart aims to explore and present new movements and works with artists operating across the spectrum of “Street Art”. Street art has its roots in situationism, graffiti, post-graffiti, muralism, comic culture, stencil art and activism amongst many other things. It is without a doubt the most exciting development in visual art for decades. – Martyn Reed, Founder and Director of Nuart

The 2016 identity focused on the concept of play, one of the keywords for Nuart and one of the cornerstones of Situationism, a constant point of reference for the festival. The main visual elements; digitally outlined blobs which reference collage, cut-outs, and hand-rendered typography; and the way the type is used in conjunction with this; are a digital take on the DIY aesthetic associated with Situationism and its related movements and styles of political graffiti and image-making.

The image featured across the 2016 identity is a mural by Fintan Magee.

Studio Bergini were responsible for the visual identity and all related materials, including everything from posters, flyers, advertising banners, newspaper and magazine ads, t-shirts and tote bags, food tokens, exhibition vinyls, web banners, newsletters – as well as a newspaper catalog containing critical essays by leading academics, artists, and curators in the field.

A small side-project was initiated during the 4-day festival period, in which eight 3×1m banners with situationist slogans were installed around the city of Stavanger.

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Nuart Festival 2016,

Nuart,

Visual identity,

2016

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The Royal Duplication Centre

The Royal Duplication Centre is our stencil duplication/Riso printing workshop currently based in the Visual Communication department at the Royal College of Art in South Kensington, London.

At the start of 2016, we were asked to set up our printing equipment in the RCA to introduce the MA Visual Communication department to Riso printing. Since March that year, we have been managing the workshop, opening its services twice per week to teach the workings of the Riso printing process through introductory sessions and Riso-related workshops, experimentation, and helping students print their work.

Royal Duplication Shopping Centre
(website by Kristoffer Halse Sølling)

instagram: @royal_duplication_centre

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The Royal Duplication Centre,

Royal College of Art, London,

Riso workshop,

2016–present

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Happy Endings

William Davey approached us to design a book for one of his projects, Happy Endings. Our task was to give his texts and illustrations the likeness of a furniture catalog while supporting his examination of classic British soap operas, which we achieved through subtle typographic references.

Statement from William Davey:

This project examines the storyline conventions and structures of soap operas.

As a viewer we are told that the soap opera offers a reflection of real life through the identification of character tropes and hard hitting storylines. However, I believe soaps really offer a dramatized voyeurism through the ongoing episode, or the ever expanding middle.

These archetypical soap opera assemblies easily lend themselves to the pre-packaged furniture catalogue.
The catalogue promises convenience of choice, stylish design at an affordable price, and the organization of life through Tupperware boxes and waste storage ideas.

By reframing the soap opera in the context of the furniture catalogue I aim to reposition the familiar archetypes as a self assembly, flat pack commodity.

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Happy Endings,

William Davey,

Artist publication,

2016

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Primitive Propositions

Primitive Propositions: A Proposal for Exhibition is a publication made in collaboration with artist collective Jeffrey Charles Henry Peacock including contributions from Terry Atkinson (of Art & Language), Michael Hampton, and Matthew Poole. It is intended as a form of artist proposal, exhibition, and art object in itself.
The publication comes in the form of an A5 ring binder containing various text-based inserts, utilising a wide variety of printing processes and materials. It was necessary that the proposal could be added to, amended, and corrected over an extended period of time, as further research was collected by the artists. Finding a form that could successfully contend with these difficulties was important.

The binder arises from the idea of a physical artist proposal. The typography is reduced to a default digital standard such as those found in software like MS Word. Times was used as the primary typeface; but was tweaked to include square dots rather than circular ones, as a reference to the grid drawings in the first part of the project.

The organization of the publication is meant to reflect the relative inaccessibility of much of the written content, by appearing as a dry, bureaucratic object, and by requiring an effort of physical engagement in order to simply access the content.

Primitive Propositions: A Proposal for Exhibition was launched as an edition of 350 copies at the East Street Arts in Leeds, October 2015, as part of an accompanying exhibition coinciding with the opening of The British Art Show.

However, additional material was added post-launch, with a second and final launch of the publication taking place at the Westminster Reference Library in London, December 2016.
A potential future exhibition would see the finalization of the overall project.

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Primitive Propositions,

Jeffrey Charles Henry Peacock,

Artist publication,

2016

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BA Fine Art Catalogue

The Central Saint Martins BA Fine Art class of 2015 asked us to design their graduation show catalog. The initial brief was to make the catalog soft-covered and magazine-sized, with a minimal design that would let the artworks speak for themselves, while at the same time avoiding a rigid and repetitive layout.

For each of the almost 150 students we had to accompany images of artworks, descriptions, and a blurb. There were also seven commissioned essays and one interview to include.

Our solution was to develop a grid system with the ability to accommodate all of those different elements, but that would also look good if it were in places to contain only one of the elements, as we anticipated the contributors would likely not all be supplying the same kind of content. And due to the sheer volume of content, our system had to be very rational and leave very few variables for us to adjust, so that we wouldn’t have to obsess over details too much. At the same time the system had to have a certain flexibility to it, in order to give an impression of continuous movement.

The front and back covers have a full alphabetical index of all the contributing students with their contact details.
We also designed and screen printed 50 neon pink dust jackets for the sponsors of the production of the publication.

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BA Fine Art Catalogue,

CSM BA Fine Art,

Exhibition catalogue,

2015

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Variations I

Variations I was conceived as a series of chance operations that ultimately led to the creation of a publication realised by Central Saint Martins students in London.

Variations I consists of a set of instructions that like musical scores have the potential to be realised by anyone other than the original creator. The instructions involve real and imaginary actions, ideas, and objects from everyday life re-contextualised as performance.

Taking its name from an experimental musical score written by the American composer John Cage in 1958, Variations I aims to turn its readers into active interpreters and participants by enabling them to perform, interpret and play with the instructions in different ways.

Inspired by Fluxus and conceptual artistic and curatorial practices of the 1960s, this publication could be seen as having a tripartite nature: as an “object” to be played with, a “portable exhibition” consisting of “Open Works”, and as a collection of “Texts” to be performed.

Our role in this collaboration was as art directors, designers, co-curators, and contributors. The publication was risograph printed, french-folded, and bound with a binding clip. These factors all serve the purpose of making a cost-effective, intriguing, tactile object that could be easily disassembled, reassebled, and used.

variations1.tumblr.com

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Variations I,

Marta Cacciavillani,

Artist publication,

2014

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Thierry Noir – A Retrospective

We produced this publication for Howard Griffin Gallery London on the occasion of Thierry Noir’s first ever retrospective exhibition. The booklet is comprised of an artist statement and an interview, as well as Noir’s own photos with accompanying stories.

From the gallery website:

Thierry Noir: A Retrospective was the first solo exhibition of the infamous Berlin Wall artist Thierry Noir. In 1984, Noir was the first artist to illegally paint mile upon mile of the Berlin Wall. Noir wanted to perform one real revolutionary act: to paint the Wall, to transform it, to make it ridiculous, and ultimately to help destroy it.

Noir’s iconic, bright and seemingly innocent works painted on this deadly border symbolised a sole act of defiance and a lone voice of freedom.

In this landmark exhibition at Howard Griffin Gallery in Shoreditch, new original works were exhibited alongside rarely seen photographs, interviews and films, juxtaposing old and new to reassess Noir’s enduring legacy and contribution to society.

howardgriffingallery.com

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Thierry Noir – A Retrospective,

Howard Griffin Gallery,

Publication,

2014

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CSM Public

Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design celebrated the launch of CSM Public on January 14th 2016 with Art, Design and the Common Good – an evening of debate and exhibitions exploring how art and design schools can collaborate with academic, corporate, non-profit, and government organisations to develop new ways of engaging with societal issues. For the launch, we were approached to design a tabloid publication to showcase the projects that CSM have already initiated in the spirit of CSM Public.

With a good mix of articles, essays, student spotlights, and box-outs appearing in the publication, we developed a flexible layout combining the structure of a newspaper and the variation of a magazine in order to unify all the content and present it in a simple, logical way without making the publication feel static.

(more about CSM Public and online version of the publication)

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CSM Public,

Central Saint Martins,

Promotional publication,

2016

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Nuart Festival 15 Years

Nuart Festival is one of the world’s biggest and most well-known street art festivals; and the only one of its kind; being set in the context of Stavanger; a small city on the south-west coast of Norway.

Serving as the catalog for the 2015 version of the festival and its accompanying academic program Nuart Plus, this publication consisted of events programme, artist profiles, artist interviews, and critical essays. The programme was themed around Situationism & Play, and explored how Punk, Graffiti and Street Art have been affected by increasing commercial and academic interest in these movements.

2015 marked the fifteenth anniversary of the Nuart Festival. As a commemoration of the years passed, we took a series of snapshots of “classic” Nuart pieces; old, forgotten, fading, or generally overlooked artworks around the city; and scattered them throughout the publication. A rusty, overgrown Pøbel made the cover page.

As is tradition, the printing was handled by the local newspaper press.

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Nuart Festival 15 Years,

Nuart,

Publication,

2015

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ZEEN–ZEEN

“We are all digital hoarders”
— Kenneth Goldsmith

ZEEN–ZEEN is a developing series of publications exploring the concept of digital hoarding. It consists of the collections of screen shots, downloads, and other digitally acquired imagery sitting on the desktops of the two authors (us).

We realised that “digital hoarding” is a side-effect of what we do day-to-day; a kind of constant sense of research, a subconscious instinct that kicks in during daily routine, when suddenly we spot something of interest that prompts us to take a picture and drop it in a folder on the desktop, where under normal circumstances it would just stay untouched together with hundreds of others.

ZEEN–ZEEN is our way of making use of – and trying to make sense of – this “instinct”, and of presenting it to the world in a somewhat readable way.

Haphazardously throwing the content onto the spreads without much consideration or curation is our way of maintaining the chaotic nature of the process and the internet in general. A book is the possibly most unlikely destiny for our material, but presenting it as a physical object somehow elevates the status of the random, digital content to a level where a reader might start reading things into it.

The ZEENs are printed and published through Lulu.com, and can be ordered through their website.

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ZEEN–ZEEN,

Studio Bergini,

Zines,

2014–present

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